Wood Species

Showing 109–120 of 138 results

  • Cerejira is an important wood in the dry portions of central and southern South America. It is noted for its beauty, durability, strength and stability, thus making this tough, versatile wood ideal for a variety of applications. Left undisturbed, trees can grow to towering dimensions — producing valuable, coveted slabs which are renowned for their incredibly detailed, 3D-like crotch sections.

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    Sustainability: This species is not currently listed in the CITES Appendices; it has yet to be recognized by the IUCN.

    Common Uses: Construction, furniture, caibetry, veneer, and other applications.

    Comments: Larger trees are cut almost exclusively for their often quite dramatic slabs — which appeal to South American furniture craftsmen, as well as exotic slab importers around the world. Despite being generally very popular with those familiar with it, Cerejira has managd to stay off of a lot of people’s radar. (… including the IUCN!) Many of the highly figured logs are consumed by the veneer industry.

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  • This somewhat obscure, seldom-seen South American wood is typically a light to golden brown color; with large open pores, marked by prominent red vessel lines, decorating its grainy surface. It is difficult to differentiate the sap, as it is only slightly lighter in color and not clearly demarcated. Its pores are some of the largest of any commercial lumber in the world, with vessel diameters routinely between 300 and 500 micrometers. The dark contrast of the pores give the wood a very unique “veiny” look that is popular with some Latin American furniture craftsmen.

    Its grains are typically straight, but can be slightly interlocked. It has a coarse texture, but it will sand smooth and produce a nice natural luster after doing so.

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    Sustainability: This species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Furniture (occasional), turned objects, construction/utility wood, and paper (pulpwood).

    Comments: The wood is moderately durable, but offers little resistance to insect attack; it is best utilized in indoor applications. It works easy and glues and finishes well, which is why it is also a popular choice of the small segment of wood turners familiar with it. Cedrorana (or “Tornillo,” as it is also commonly known) is a relatively inexpensive wood with a lot of character.

    Cedrorana is a moderately durable wood, but is considered to be susceptible to insect attack.

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  • Boasting rich hues — ranging from mellow ambers, to reddish cinnamons and sienna browns — Western Red Cedar is one of the most unique, beautiful softwoods in the world. Its grains are straight, and its texture is uniform and fine-grained, with a satin-like luster. It’s durability makes it ideally suited for a variety of outdoor applications. It’s easy to work, and glues and finishes well.

    Despite its lightweight and modest density, the wood has tremendous dimensional stability.

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  • Not a true cedar (of the Cedra genus), Spanish Cedar is actually more closely related to true mahoganies, as all are in the Meliaceae family. Weight, Density and mechanical properties can vary, depending on climate and conditions. Most of what is made available to the US market is plantation-grown, which produces wood that is lower in density, and paler in color than that cut from trees grown in forests. Its grains are straight and its texture is fine; combined with its modest hardness and density, the wood is very easy to work, and glues and finishes well.

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    Sustainability: This species is in CITES Appendix III, and is listed as “Vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List.

    Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, cabinetry, musical instruments (flamenco and classical guitar soundboards), humidors, and boatbuilding.

    Comments: The CITES Appendix III listing for Spanish Cedar applies to the countries of Brazil, Bolivia, Columbia, Guatemala, and Peru (voluntary restructed exportation). It remains freely exported from other Latin American countries. The wood is renowned for its impressive strength-to-weight ratio and (resultingly) great resonance, which is why it has been a standard choice as the soundboard for classical and flamenco guitars built in these regions for generations.

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  • Also called Mlanje Cedar. Identical to our own Clanwilliam Cedar from the Cedarberg, and also under threat. Not allowed to be harvested except under strict control. We are lucky to have obtained our legally sawn stock some years ago. A lovely timber to work with, but difficult to finish, due to the natural oils it contains. A feature of the planks is the names scratched on in charcoal by the workers who carry the planks down the mountain. Planks are cut just the right dimensions for one man to carry unassisted, and they obviously have an immense pride in their work. We are privileged to be able to offer this wood, while stocks last.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices but is on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common uses: turning, paneling, furniture.

    Comments: Works and turns easily.  Finishing can be a challenge, as the natural oils tend to inhibit drying of finish. Can be overcome by sealing with lacquer first.

     

     

     

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  • Japanese Cedar is the national tree of Japan, where it is highly-prized for the scented, strong-but-lightweight timber it produces. It’s significance extends beyond that, as its impact on Japanese culture is reflected by the fact that it is found planted at numerous scared sites throughout the country. The wood is reddish-pink in color, straight-grained and medium textured; it glues, stains and finishes well. Its impressive strength-to-weight ratio and excellent working properties makes it ideal for all varieties of construction applications.

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    Sustainability: This species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, but is categorized as “Near Threatened” by the IUCN.

    Common Uses: Shipbuilding, commercial & residential construction, furniture, woodturning and carving. (Incense is derived from its leaves.)

    Comments: It is also important to note that this lumber is waterproof, which is why, historically, it has been utilized in Japanese boat and shipbuilding; and has been prized for centuries across its indigenous regions. Natural forests in Japan that include this species are now very rare, with the bulk of Cryptomeria timber coming from commerical tree plantations.

    As you would expect from any wood bearing the word “Cedar” in its name, knots are not uncommon with this wood; otherwise, it has very cooperative working traits.

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  • Himalayan Cedar is an important timber tree in Pakistan, Kashmir and NW India. Its wood is noted for being strong and durable mostly utilized in construction, carpentry and furniture applications in its indigenous regions. The trees are also known for the fragrant essential oil they produce (distilled from wood chips and sawdust), which is used throughout Northeast Asia to protect livestock from mosquitos, gnats and other airborn pests; it also has anti-fungal properties. Heartwood ranges from a light tan to light brown with a reddish tint. Grains are typically straight; it is fine, even textured with a high natural luster. The wood is reputed to have excellent working properties, as well as an impressive strength-to-weight ratio.

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    Sustainability: This species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, and is classified as “a species of least concern,” by the IUCN.

    Common Uses: Construction timber, furniture, carpentry, door & window frames, bridges, railway cars and essential oil production.

    Comments: Himalayan Cedar was introduced to Europe in 1822, and to the United States, nine years later, in 1831. Transplanted trees typically pale in comparison with examples from its indigenous regions, where, left undisturbed, trees can reach towering heights. The wood is prized throughout the world; not just for its strength, but also for its pleasant fragrance and its durability and resistance to bugs and insects.

    The name ‘Deodar’ evolved from the word “devad?ru,” which is a Sanskrit word that translates to “timber of the gods”. The Himalayan Cedar tree is a sacred tree in Hinduism.

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  • A firm, stable hardwood, Aromatic Red Cedar is renowned for its durability, resistance to both rot and insects, and its wonderful, fresh, natural fragrance. With is bright pinkish red colors contrasting with a light, pale yellow base, the wood is rarely ever stained or painted. Another aesthetic trademark is the typical scores of knots which decorate its two-toned surface.

    The wood is fine grained, although knots and silica content can complicate what is otherwise a fairly cooperative set of working properties. It glues and finishes well, although it is very common to leave this wood unfinished so not to squelch its antiseptic aroma.

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    Sustainability: This species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (reported by the IUCN to be a “species of least concern”).

    Common Uses: Chests, closet and chest linings, carvings, outdoor furniture, fence posts, birdhouses, pencils, bows, humidors and other small wooden specialty items.

    Comments: This is a very popular wood for storing precious articles of clothing and personal effects, and any applications where its fragrance can offset more odiferously offensive items (such as shoes). 🙂 Trees are quite adaptable; despite a typically slow growth rate, Red Cedar is capable of growing in a variety of climates and soil conditions. (Typically, a warmer the climate yields faster growth.)

    Rarely do trees exceed 50 feet in height at full maturity, although if left undisturbed they have been known to reach levels of 90 to 100 feet. Wide boards are seldom found; just as is finding a clear (knot-free) piece!

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  • Alaskan Cedar has been a wood embroiled in controversy with botanical and wood experts, historically, as the wood has experienced its genus reclassified on six different times over the course of the last two centuries. Despite its relatively light weight and density, it is a very durable and quite versatile species — having seen duty in numerous indoor and outdoor applications. The wood has also become a popular choice with luthiers, for acoustic guitar soundboards.

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    Sustainability: This species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (reported by the IUCN to be a “species of least concern”).

    Common Uses: Carving, boatbuilding, siding, flooring, decking, outdoor furniture, musical instruments (flutes; acoustic guitar soundboards), boxes and chests, and various utility/construction applications.

    Comments: Contrary to other published data (by the Wood Database), the typical growth range for these trees in the wild is only between 40 and 80 feet tall. Undisturbed specimens have reached heights of 100 feet, and some have been reputed to be as old as 3500 years! Despite its modest weight and density figures, it is a very tough wood; its trees hold their own through some very challenging conditions. This makes it a very versatile wood, suitable for a host of different applications.

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  • For its weight, Camphor exhibits extremely good strength properties. It has low stiffness and resistance to shock loads, and medium crushing strength. The wood works easily with both hand and machine tools. It nails, screws and glues satisfactorily, stains easily and can be brought to a very good finish. A very durable wood.  The heartwood is light in colour, but often with rather attractive darker streaks running through it.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common uses: Furniture, interior and exterior joinery, flooring, panelling and cabinet work.

    Comments: The Camphor Tree is an invader in South Africa and originates from China, Japan and Taiwan.

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  • As most of you already know, this is a very popular African import. There are multiple species of the Guibourtia genus that are known as Bubinga, so colors and aesthetics can vary dramatically. A variety of different, quite strunning figures often decorate its grains (pommelle, waterfall, mottled and wildly flamed); its base color can range from a lighter pinkish red to light- to medium-brown. Trees can grow to towering proportions, so the larger specimens are often cut into large, live-edge slabs.

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    Sustainability: This species is listed in CITES Appendix II but not on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species; although there have been some rumblings that this status could be changing, amidst a downturn in (US) supply over the last year or so.

    Common Uses: Veneer, inlays, musical instruments, fine furniture, cabinetry, turnings, and other specialty items.

    Comments: Bubinga is well known for its use as a rosewood substitute. [Ironically, perhaps, more strikingly figured examples (with pommelle or waterfall figuring) can fetch prices greatly eclipsing typical rosewood price thresholds.] The wood has become hugely popular and constantly in demand with veneer mills, furniture craftsmen — who love building desks and conference tables with the often stunning, huge slabs — and progressive guitar luthiers. Its nickname, “African Rosewood,” can be very misleading, as the wood is not of the Dalbergia species, and not all wood sold as “African Rosewood” is Bubinga (or is even of the Guibourtia species).

    Over the last year, we’ve seen supplies in the US dip — leading to price increases on the wholsale and retail level, and causing some sources to speculate that Bubinga could possibly be drawing the attention of CITES and / or the IUCN in the very near future.

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  • Kamassi has a fine texture and it works and polishes well.  It is a good substitute for genuine Boxwood (albeit slightly darker and greener in colour).  It occurs in evergreen forests of the Eastern Cape of South Africa.  In the past, it was exported for the manufacture of small specialty items (tool handle’s, chessmen, etc).  Shuttles produced from Kamassi were once preferred by textile manufacturers, because they wore smoothly in the loom.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common uses: Turned objects, carving, musical instruments, chessmen, small specialty wood items.

    Comments: The bark and the leaves of Kamassi trees are reported to be “deadly poisonous”

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