Wood Species

Showing 133–137 of 137 results

  • Along with Hickory and Oak, Ash is one of the most commonly used utility woods in the US. It’s toughness and excellent shock resistance makes it a popular choice for tool handles. Its grains are typically straight, and its coarse texture has drawn comparisons to that of Oak. Combined with its modest price, White Ash’s easy working properties, generally light overall color and good gluing and finishing characteristics make it a popular wood for a variety of practical and utility applications.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common uses: Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball bats, and other turned objects such as tool handles.

    Comments: White Ash is the tallest growing of the true ash (Fraxinus) species in the US, and is the most commonly seen of the ash hardwoods. Its color ranges from a light beige to light brown, with medium to dark brown grain stripes.

    Although not nearly as popular as Swamp Ash for such applications, it is occasionally utilized as an electric guitar body wood, as it has good resonance properties.

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  • Indigenous to the tropical regions of East Africa, Anigre has been used primarily as an interior wood; it is decidedly non-durable, and thus not recoomended for outdoor applications. The wood’s aesthetics can vary greatly, as Anigre is comprised of three seperate Pouteria-genus species. Its colors can range from pale yellowish to orangish-brown wood, to a pale pinkish-brown — sometimes with additional highlight coloration. Anigre typically darkens to a golden-to reddish brown over time, with repeated UV ray exposure.

    Examples can be quite beautiful — and sometimes stunning, with curly and mottled figuring being not uncommon. Its hues tend to be generally pastel in nature, so it makes a very complimentary, aesthetically unimposing wood for a variety of interior applications. Grains are typically straight but can occasionally be interlocked. Its texture is medium and it has a nice natural luster.

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    Sustainability: Anigre is not listed in the CITES Appendices, but some species are reported by the IUCN as being “conservation dependent.” Essentially, from the IUCN’s perspective, if any of the current conservation programs protecting these respective species were to cease it would likely result in their rendering a “vulnerable” or “endangered” Red List status.

    Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, cabinetry and furniture; in board form it?s used for boatbuilding, general carpentry, and other light construction uses.

    Comments: Formerly classified in the genus “Aningeria,” Anigre is currently placed in the Pouteria genus — sometimes described as a ?wastebasket taxon? where out-of-place genera are categorized.

    Depending on specific species, Anigre has varying degrees of silica content. While possessing a moderate hardness and density, it has generally cooperative working properties, but can gum up cutters and blades.

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  • This fine grained lightweight timber from Australasia has a sheen to it unlike most other timbers. Grain can pick up during planing, but otherwise it works well. A durable timber which could be used for lightweight boatbuilding or cabinet work.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices, but is reported as being conservation dependent by the IUCN.

    Common uses: boat building, cabinetry, veneer, musical instruments and turned objects.

    Comments: Harvesting of Kauri in New Zealand is strictly controlled.

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  • In its native Africa, this handsome, rot- and bug-resistant, very durable wood has been used as a substitute for Teak (thus earning its nickname, “African Teak”). While having a similar look, it also has working and mechanical properties which mimic Teak while having none of its oiliness. (Afrormosia has a well-established track record for holding up in the most extreme conditions, proving the comparisons well justified.) Its heartwood color can be a muted tan, muted gold or any of a series of light- to medium-colored browns (from very muted to slightly, in hue), highlight by darker stripes, of varying degrees and coloration, which can run the length of its typically straight or wavy (though sometimes interlocked). Despite its similar “fuzzy” appearance (to that of Teak), it is fine grained, presenting a nice natural luster when sanded. Over time, the wood will darken, rendering an appearance often more like that of Black Walnut than of Teak. Despite being considerably harder than Teak, Afrormosia is generally very workable, and it turns, glues and finishes well.

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    Sustainability: This species is in CITES Appendix II, and is classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List.

    Common uses: Boatbuilding, veneer, flooring, cabinetry, furniture and turnings.

    Comments: Afrormosia is a very durable wood, and it works well with either hand or machine tools. Despite being tough, it is also flexible — having been used in boatbuilding in Africa for centuries. It turns, glues and finishes well. Its sometimes wavy grain patterns can make it a very aesthetically pleasing exotic wood, as well. This versatile wood has proven itself throughout the respective indigenous regions of its native continent of Africa.

    Afrormosia is well known and popular throughout Europe, boasting a pedigree of being a preferred wood for home interiors: providing a rich, luxurious option for cabinetry, trim and fine furniture. Given its moderate price range, great durability and handsome looks, this wood has untapped potential here in the US — with woodturners, furniture makers and musical instrument craftsmen, alike.

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  • This light coloured timber from Tropical West Africa is used for interior work only, mainly shopfitting, but could be used for flooring, furniture etc. Not a structural timber due to its low density and lack of durability.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common uses: Veneer, plywood, boxes, crates, turned objects, interior trim, and other small specialty wood items.

    Comments: Abura works well and takes a good finish.  It has an unpleasant odor when freshly cut and has been known to be an irritant.

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