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Abura

This light coloured timber from Tropical West Africa is used for interior work only, mainly shopfitting, but could be used for flooring, furniture etc. Not a structural timber due to its low density and lack of durability.

Common Uses:
boxes, crates, plywood, small specialty wood items., trim, turned objects, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
abura
Afrormosia

Native to West Africa, Afrormosia is a handsome, rot and bug resistant, extremely durable wood has been used as a substitute for Teak (Tectona grandis), thus earning its nickname, “African Teak”. While having a similar look, it also has working and mechanical properties that mimic Teak, whilst having none of its oiliness. (Afrormosia has a well-established track record for holding up in the most extreme conditions, proving the comparisons well justified.) Its heartwood color can be a muted tan, muted gold or any of a series of light- to medium-colored browns (from very muted to slightly, in hue), highlight by darker stripes, of varying degrees and coloration, which can run the length of its typically straight or wavy (though sometimes interlocked). Despite its similar “fuzzy” appearance (to that of Teak), it is fine grained, presenting a superb natural luster when sanded. Over time, the wood will darken, rendering an appearance often more like that of Black Walnut than of Teak. Despite being considerably harder than Teak, Afrormosia is generally very workable, offering crisp joints and it turns, glues and finishes very well.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, flooring, furniture, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
afrormosia
Agathis

This fine grained lightweight timber from Australasia has a sheen to it unlike most other timbers. Grain can pick up during planing, but otherwise it works well. A durable timber which could be used for lightweight boatbuilding or cabinet work.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, musical Instruments, turned objects, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
agathis
Anegre

Indigenous to the tropical regions of East Africa and West Africa, as far south as Angola.¬† Anegre has been used primarily as an interior wood; it is decidedly non-durable, and thus not recommended for outdoor applications. The wood’s aesthetics can vary greatly, as Anegre is comprised of three separate species within the Pouteria genus. Its colors can range from pale yellowish to orangish-brown wood, to a pale pinkish-brown, sometimes with additional highlight coloration. Anegre typically darkens to a golden-to reddish brown over time, with repeated UV ray exposure. The heartwood and sapwood of Anegre are usually not distinguishable from each other.

Anegre has a medium texture with closed pores similar to Maple.  The species is easy to work with both hand and power tools.
Examples can be quite beautiful — and sometimes stunning, with curly and mottled figuring being not uncommon. Its hues tend to be generally pastel in nature, so it makes a very complimentary, aesthetically unimposing wood for a variety of interior applications. Grains are typically straight but can occasionally be interlocked. Its texture is medium and it has a nice natural luster.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, carpentry, construction, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
anegre
Ash - American

Along with Hickory and Oak, Ash is one of the most commonly used utility woods in the US and is native to Eastern and¬† Central North America. It’s toughness and excellent shock resistance, makes it a popular choice for tool handles, baseball bats, furniture and flooring Grains are typically straight, and its coarse texture has drawn comparisons to that of Oak. Combined with its modest price, White Ash’s easy working properties, generally light overall color and good gluing and finishing characteristics make it a popular wood for a variety of practical and utility applications.

Common Uses:
boxmaking, flooring, turnings
Detail
Common Uses
ash-american
Ash - European

Almost indistinguishable from American Ash in look, but often found in wider boards and whiter/clearer in colour. Suitable for countertops, cabinets, and interior furniture. A good timber for steam bending, and could be used for small parts on boats. Not particularly durable.

Common Uses:
baseball bats, boxes, crates, flooring, millwork, tool handles, turned objects
Detail
Common Uses
ash-european
Ash - Thermo

Ash is an attractive and sustainable hardwood with a lively grain pattern but it is not durable enough to be used externally without treatment. Novawood’s market-leading thermal treatment fundamentally alters the structure of the timber to provide biological durability and ensure a long life span in harsh weather conditions.

It’s excellent dimensional stability, beautiful grain structure, attractive brown colour and technical features add value to outdoor spaces and ensure optimum results.  Novawood Thermo Ash Decking is totally free of chemicals and is FSC-certified.

Please note that we also stock Novawood Thermo Ash in 50mm dressed timber for use as structural members, battens, handrails and other trim items.
Common Uses:
decking, flooring, furniture
Detail
Common Uses
ash-thermo
Avodire

Avodire is native to West Africa and is sometimes utilized as a Mahogany substitute (which is appropriate, since both are in the Meliaceae family), with similar aesthetics and cooperative working properties. Typical colors range from a pale yellow to cream, and a variety of figured grain patterns are commonly found including wavy, mottled and ripple, typically accompanied by dramatic levels of chatoyance – which makes it very popular with veneer manufacturers. It’s sapwood can be difficult to differentiate from the heartwood. While its grain patterns can be straight, wavy, irregular or interlocked, its texture is fine and it has an impressive natural luster which has led to it being called African Satinwood.

 

Common Uses:
cabinetry, furniture, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
avodire
Balau

This hard and heavy timber comes from Malaysia.  It is very dense with high bending and crushing strengths. The wood is moderately difficult to work with machines as the interlocked grains and toughness has a blunting effect on tools. It is best to pre-dill for screwing and gluing results are variable. Very durable and immune from insect or fungal attack.

Common Uses:
decking, plywood, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
balau
Basswood

Basswood’s color ranges from a pale off-white to pale yellow, to a very light muted brown. The species is known for its excellent strength-to-weight ratio, although its lack of density can make it susceptible to damage if placed under excessive weight. While species from the Tilia genus are referred to as either “Lime” or “Linden” in Europe, in North America it is commonly called “Basswood.”

Straight grains and fine texture combined with its soft character — make Basswood exceptionally easy to work. It glues and finishes well, but does not bend well. Its consistency, light color, light density and hardness (bordering on that of a softwood) has made it a popular fine carving wood for centuries.

Common Uses:
carving, fencing, musical Instruments, utility lumber, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
basswood
Beech - American

Both American Beech and its European counterpart are known for their pale cream coloration, which is often augmented by a pink or light- to medium-colored muted reddish-brown hue. Its medium texture and typically straight grains and sometimes wavy, give it excellent working properties. American Beech cuts, turns, glues and finishes very well and has a moderate natural luster.

Flat-sawn pieces usually have very plain-looking aesthetics; the bulk of which is used for utility purposes. Conversely, quartersawn pieces typically exhibit a silvery fleck pattern — which lends the wood well to furniture and musical instrument applications, with more exquisite examples often finding their way to veneer mills.

Common Uses:
flooring, furniture, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
beech-american
Beech - European

Like American Beech, this wood features pale cream coloration, also often augmented by a pink or muted light reddish-brown hue. It’s large supply across the continent and typically modest price range makes it one of the most popular and commercially important hardwoods in Europe. Its straight grains and medium texture give comparable working and steam-bending properties to its American first cousin and it machines, turns, glues and finishes with ease.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, flooring, furniture, musical Instruments, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
beech-european
Berlinia

Known in the US, primarily as either “Ebiara” or, its nickname, “Red Zebrawood,” Berlinia’s heartwood can range anywhere from a pale yellow to a (more typical) muted reddish-brown. Darker colored stripes in patterns (which can be symmetrical or irregular) are how the comparisons to Zebrano are drawn, although they are related: each of their respective genera are part of the Detarieae tribe, in the subfamily, Caesalpinioideae.

Grains are general straight or interlocked. Although its texture is medium to coarse, it has a high degree of natural luster and can display figure and chatoyance. It works well — cutting, turning, gluing and finishing smoothly — although tear-out with interlocked grains is not uncommon.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, furniture, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
berlinia
Birch - Flame

Flame Birch is not a species in and of itself, but rather the name given to Yellow Birch with a beautiful flamed figure across the grain.  Yellow Birch heart wood can vary from pale yellow to a light, muted reddish brown; sapwood is grayish-white. There are many species of Birch worldwide, it is one of the most popular woods, ironically, for both veneer and utility applications. Figured pieces are the more desirable for veneer, with wide, dramatic curly figuring (similar to Cherry) decorating the surface.

American Birch works easily and it turns, glues and finishes well, although most boards have very little natural luster. It’s a versatile wood that can be used for a number of different applications, but it needs to be protected, as the wood will decay when exposed to the elements.

Common Uses:
boxmaking, crafting, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
birch-flame
Birch - Flame Roasted

“Roasting” Flame Birch involves gradually heating the wood up to temperatures of greater than 160 degrees celcius in special heat chambers made of stainless steel under anoxic conditions. The heat removes organic compounds from the wood cells, changing both the physical and chemical make-up of the wood. The process is natural and chemical free. It darkens the wood to a beautiful rich chocolatey brown color whilst still showing the gorgeous grain and figure of the underlying wood.

The thermally modified wood is more dimensionally stable, but the process does reduce bending strength and make the wood a little more brittle. This makes it chip a little easier than the un-modified lumber. The brittleness makes it less suitable for intricate cabinetry, but it is still an excellent choice for less intricate items such as floors, tops, panels, cladding etc.

Extra care needs to be taken when finishing thermally modified wood, as the “bone dry” wood has a tendency to “suck in” much of what is given to it. Our in-house woodworking specialist has had excellent results with Osmo PolyX. He suggests a thicker finish will work better.

Common Uses:
flooring, interior panelling
Detail
Common Uses
birch-flame-roasted
Birch - Masur

Masur Birch (also known as Karelian Birch) is not a species in of itself, but rather a particular grain figure that occurs in various species of European Birch.  The result is a beautiful marble like figure – a mix between burl and birdseye.

The cause of this figure is uncertain.  Some say that it comes from a tree’s reaction to invasion by the larvae of the Agromyzia carbonara beetle, but the general opinion seems to be that it is hereditary, classifying the name of the variant as Betula pendula var. Carelica.  Regardless of the exact origin of the figure, it provides us with stunning and unique looking lumber, just begging to be showcased in some fine woodworking. It is most commonly used in accent details, turned objects, knife handles and other small specialty items.

Veneers of Masur Birch are rotary cut (like Birdseye Maple) to ensure the best figure is extracted for the veneer.

Common Uses:
fine furniture, knife handles, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
birch-masur
Birch Plywood

Available in a range of thicknesses and grades, Birch Plywood is a wonderful, high-end board product used in the production of cabinets, furniture and more. With a consistent layer thicknesses, a thick veneer face and all voids patched, Birch Plywood is visually appealing on face grain and end grain, structurally sound and stable in use (indoor application only).

Our Birch Plywood comes from Eastern Europe and we stock both S/BB and BB/BB grades with thicknesses ranging from 6.5mm to 21mm in standard sheet dimensions of 2.45mx1.22m

Grade Summary:
S/BB:  Better face  clear – may have occasional patch.  Second face is BB grade.

BB/BB: both faces are grade BB.  Can be up to 29 patches, a side, but typically 3-6 patches a side.

 

Common Uses:
boxes, cabinetry, carpentry, construction
Detail
Common Uses
birch-plywood
Blackwood - African

African Blackwood is native to the seasonally dry regions of Africa, from Senegal eastwards to Eritrea and southwards to the northern parts of South Africa. Without question, the densest and most un-rosewood-like of the Dalbergia’s (for our money, at least!), African Blackwood is a consistent favorite with acoustic guitar luthiers, wood turners, carvers and fine furniture craftsmen, alike. It remains one of the world’s most coveted musical woods. African Blackwood often appears almost completely black, with its grains hardly discernible. (… thus the name. After sanding, a deep, very dark chocolate color emerges.)

Common Uses:
carving, handles, inlay, turnings
Detail
Common Uses
blackwood-african
Blackwood - Knysna

A close cousin to Hawaii’s coveted Koa, Australian Blackwood is growing in popularity as it becomes more known in both guitar and furniture-building circles. Its name is misleading, as there are no black hues ever seen in its grains. Highly-figured lumber is not uncommon, nor are pieces with a shimmering chatoyance, reminiscent of Koa. Hardwood colors can range from a light golden brown to various dark shades of brown; streak and highlights of various differing colors is not uncommon. Sap colors can range from tan to a dull light gray, and is clearly demarcated. Its grains can range from straight to wavy to interlocked, and its texture is typically fine, with an impressive natural luster.

Other than the occasional tear-out, issues associated with lumber with interlocking grains, the wood is very easily worked. It turns, glues, and finishes well. Australian Blackwood also bends easily, which combined with its toughness and durability,  has made it an historically popular wood in Australia for boat building.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, furniture, gun stocks, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
blackwood-acacia
Blackwood - Knysna

Knysna Blackwood originally comes from Australia. It was introduced into South Africa in the early 1800’s.  Its name is a little misleading, as there are no black hues ever seen in its grains. Highly-figured lumber is not uncommon, nor are pieces with a shimmering chatoyance, reminiscent of Koa. Hardwood colors can range from a light golden brown to various dark shades of brown; streak and highlights of various differing colors is not uncommon. Sap colors can range fron tan to a dull light gray, and is clearly demarcated. Its grains can range from straight to wavy to interlocked, and its texture is typically fine, with an impressive natural luster.
Other than the occasional tearout issues associated with lumber with interlocking grains, the wood is very easily worked. It turns, glues, and finishes well. We believe it is also bends easily, which — combined with its toughness and durability — has made it an historically popular wood in Australia for boat building.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, furniture, gun stocks, musical Instruments, specialty wood items, turned objects, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
blackwood-knysna
Bloodwood

Also known as “Satine,” Bloodwood is an exotic South American import that continues to grow in popularity here in the states. It’s dark, savory red tones, untypically do not fade, mute or darken much over time. It is known for its “satiny,” highly-chatoyant finish. While the heartwood typically is comprised of red hues, it is known to have variances ranging from oranges to pale yellows, interspersed. It’s impressive density makes it ideal for an electric guitar fretboard or an acoustic guitar back and sides; wood turners love it, as well, for its fabulous, unique aesthetics and very reasonable price.

Common Uses:
carving, furniture, inlay, knife handles, lutherie, trim, turnings
Detail
Common Uses
bloodwood
Bocote

With colors ranging from its typically golden brown base, to its dark brown and black striped accents, the surface of Bocote is perhaps best known for the many tiny “eyes” adorning the grain patterns of the highly-decorated, more visually stunning examples of the species. (These eyes are not to be confused with knots, as they pose no issues when machining.) The striking aesthetics that higher-grade pieces possess, make this wood coveted among furniture and cabinet craftsmen, as well as both acoustic and electric guitar luthiers.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, fine furniture, flooring, gun stocks, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
bocote
Boire

Boire is known throughout Africa to be a tough, durable wood, despite it’s Maple-like density. It is reputed to remain smooth under friction, which makes it ideally suited for its primary use in flooring. The sapwood of Boire is pale brown in color; its heartwood is typically medium brown to bronze, with dark streaks (and sometimes other hues, such as oranges and yellows, intermingled). The species has interlocked grain, and fine and uniform in texture. Other than the tear-out commonly associated with interlocking grains, the wood has good working properties.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, construction, flooring, furniture, gun stocks, joinery, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
boire
Boxwood

While the term “boxwood” has become quite convoluted over time, this species, Buxus macowanii, is considered a close cousin to ‘the original boxwood.’ (Buxus sempervirens). It’s pale, creamy yellowish hues make it popular with wood turners and especially carvers, as Boxwood is renowned for its capacity to hold crisp, fine details and it has a smooth, very fine texture.

Trees rarely make it much passed 20 feet in height and trunk diameters max out at only 6 inches in diameter. Not surprisingly, this limits its supply to primarily small, craft-sized pieces. The very small logs (if you can even call them that) it produces are often cracked, due to its tough, dense nature. Beware of other species, similar in color and density, being sold as boxwood.

The Boxwood that we carry has been carefully air dried over many years and originates from South Africa.

Common Uses:
carving, chess pieces, handles, musical Instruments, specialty items, turnings
Detail
Common Uses
boxwood
Bubinga

As most of you already know, this is an extremely popular African import. Found across equatorial Africa, there are multiple species of the Guibourtia genus that are known as Bubinga, so colors and aesthetics can vary dramatically. A variety of different, quite stunning figures often decorate its grains (pommelle, waterfall, mottled and wildly flamed). The base color of Bubinga can range from a lighter pinkish red to light- to medium-brown. Trees can grow to towering proportions, so the larger specimens are often cut into large, live-edge slabs.

Bubinga is well known for its use as a Rosewood substitute. Ironically, the more strikingly figured examples of Bubinga with pommelle or waterfall figuring can fetch prices greatly eclipsing typical rosewood price thresholds. This wood has become hugely popular and is constantly in demand with veneer mills & furniture craftsmen who love building desks and conference tables with the often stunning, huge slabs and progressive guitar luthiers.

Its nickname, “African Rosewood,” can be very misleading, as the wood is not of the Dalbergia species, and not all wood sold as “African Rosewood” is Bubinga (or is even of the Guibourtia species).

Common Uses:
cabinetry, fine furniture, inlay, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
bubinga
Camphor

For its weight, Camphor exhibits extremely good strength properties. It has low stiffness and resistance to shock loads, and medium crushing strength. The wood works easily with both hand and machine tools. It nails, screws and glues satisfactorily, stains easily and can be brought to a very good finish. A very durable wood.  The heartwood is light in colour, but often with rather attractive darker streaks running through it.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, flooring, furniture, joinery, panelling
Detail
Common Uses
camphor
Cedar - Alaskan

Alaskan Cedar has been a wood historically embroiled in controversy with botanical and wood experts, as the wood has experienced its genus reclassified on six different occasions over the course of the last two centuries. Despite its relatively light weight and density, it is a very durable and quite versatile species — having seen duty in numerous indoor and outdoor applications. The wood has also become a popular choice with luthiers, for acoustic guitar soundboards.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, boxmaking, carving, construction, decking, flooring, outdoor furniture
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Common Uses
cedar-alaskan
Cedar - Aromatic

A firm & stable hardwood, Aromatic Red Cedar is renowned for its durability, resistance to both rot and insects, and its wonderful, fresh, natural fragrance. With is bright pinkish red colors contrasting with a light, pale yellow base, the wood is rarely ever stained or painted. Another aesthetic trademark is the typical scores of knots which decorate its two-toned surface.

The wood is fine grained, although knots and silica content can complicate what is otherwise a fairly cooperative set of working properties. It glues and finishes well, although it is very common to leave this wood unfinished so not to squelch its antiseptic aroma.

Common Uses:
bows, boxmaking, carving, fencing, humidors, outdoor furniture, specialty items
Detail
Common Uses
cedar-aromatic
Cedar - Himalayan

Himalayan Cedar is an important timber tree in Pakistan, Kashmir and north-western India. Its wood is noted for being strong and durable mostly utilized in construction, carpentry and furniture applications in its indigenous regions. The trees are also known for the fragrant essential oil they produce (distilled from wood chips and sawdust), which is used throughout Northeast Asia to protect livestock from mosquitos, gnats and other airborne pests and it also has anti-fungal properties. Heartwood ranges from a light tan to light brown with a reddish tint. Grains are typically straight; it is fine, even textured with a high natural luster. The wood is reputed to have excellent working properties, as well as an impressive strength-to-weight ratio.

Common Uses:
carpentry, construction, furniture, joinery
Detail
Common Uses
cedar-himalayan
Cedar - Japanese

Japanese Cedar is the national tree of Japan, where it is highly-prized for the scented, strong, but lightweight timber it produces. It’s significance extends beyond that, as its impact on Japanese culture is reflected by the fact that it is found planted at numerous sacred sites throughout the country. The wood is reddish-pink in color, straight-grained and medium textured; it glues, stains and finishes well. Its impressive strength-to-weight ratio and excellent working properties makes it ideal for all varieties of construction applications.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, carving, construction, furniture, turnings
Detail
Common Uses
cedar-japanese
Cedar - Malawian

Also called Mlanje Cedar. Identical to our own Clanwilliam Cedar from the Cedarberg, and also under threat. Not allowed to be harvested except under strict control. We are lucky to have obtained our legally sawn stock some years ago. A lovely timber to work with, but difficult to finish, due to the natural oils it contains. A feature of the planks is the names scratched on in charcoal by the workers who carry the planks down the mountain. Planks are cut just the right dimensions for one man to carry unassisted, and they obviously have an immense pride in their work. We are privileged to be able to offer this wood, while stocks last.

Common Uses:
furniture, panelling, turnings
Detail
Common Uses
cedar-malawian
Cedar - Spanish

Not a true cedar (of the Cedra genus), Spanish Cedar is actually more closely related to true mahoganies, as all are in the Meliaceae family. Weight, Density and mechanical properties can vary, depending on climate and conditions. Most of what is made available to the US market is plantation-grown, which produces wood that is lower in density, and paler in color than that cut from trees grown in forests. Its grains are straight and its texture is fine; combined with its modest hardness and density, the wood is very easy to work, and glues and finishes well.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, humidors, musical Instruments, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
cedar-spanish
Cedar - Western Red

Boasting rich hues — ranging from mellow ambers, to reddish cinnamons and sienna browns — Western Red Cedar is one of the most unique, beautiful softwoods in the world. Its grains are straight, and its texture is uniform and fine-grained, with a satin-like luster. It’s durability makes it ideally suited for a variety of outdoor applications. It’s easy to work, and glues and finishes well.

Despite its lightweight and modest density, the wood has tremendous dimensional stability.

Common Uses:
exterior cladding
Detail
Common Uses
cedar-western-red
Cedrorana

This somewhat obscure, seldom-seen South American wood is typically a light to golden brown color; with large open pores, marked by prominent red vessel lines, decorating its grainy surface. It is difficult to differentiate the sapwood, as it is only slightly lighter in color and not clearly demarcated. Its pores are some of the largest of any commercial lumber in the world, with vessel diameters routinely between 300 and 500 micrometers. The dark contrast of the pores give the wood a very unique “veiny” look that is popular with some Latin American furniture craftsmen.

Common Uses:
construction, furniture, turnings
Detail
Common Uses
cedrorana
Cerejeira

Cerejira is an important wood in the dry portions of central and southern South America. It is noted for its beauty, durability, strength and stability, thus making this tough, versatile wood ideal for a wide variety of applications. Left undisturbed, trees can grow to towering dimensions — producing valuable, coveted slabs which are renowned for their incredibly detailed, almost 3D-like crotch sections.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, construction, furniture, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
cerejeira
Cerejeira - Crotch

Cerejira is an important wood in the dry portions of central and southern South America. It is noted for its beauty, durability, strength and stability, thus making this tough, versatile wood ideal for a variety of applications. Left undisturbed, trees can grow to towering dimensions — producing valuable, coveted slabs which are renowned for their incredibly detailed, 3D-like crotch sections.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, construction, furniture, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
cerejeira-crotch
Cherry - American

Black Cherry is an important domestic hardwood, long associated with fine furniture and a favorite of many master craftsmen. When freshly cut, the wood has a tan to light brown color with a pink or red tint. The dark reddish-brown (russet) color it exhibits after aging is often imitated through the use of stains on other woods. The sapwood is pale yellow colored. Grains can be straight or irregular; combined with its moderate density, this makes the wood easily workable. The most desired examples are of the curly-figured variety, which can be bold and quite dramatic.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, fine furniture, flooring, millwork, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
cherry-american
Cherry - American Curly

The beautifully figured version of American/Black Cherry.

Black Cherry is an important domestic hardwood, long associated with fine furniture and a favorite of many master craftsmen. When freshly cut, the wood has a tan to light brown color with a pink or red tint. The dark reddish-brown (russet) color that it exhibits after aging is often imitated through the use of stains on other woods. The sap is pale yellow colored. Grains can be straight or irregular; combined with its moderate density, this makes the wood easily workable. The most desired examples are of the curly-figured variety, which can be bold and quite dramatic.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, fine furniture, flooring, millwork, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
cherry-american-curly
Cherry - European

Sweet Cherry is one of the premier European furniture timbers.  In theory it grows all over Europe and Great Britain, but can at times be difficult to source.  It is easy to machine and work with but can be a bit difficult to stain, as results can be a bit blotchy.  It bends well with steam and turns and carves well.

Common Uses:
carving, furniture, specialty wood items, trim, turned objects, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
cherry-european
Chestnut - European

Durable and relatively affordable, European Chestnut is a popular cladding species in Europe.  With looks similar to Oak and Ash, we are sure you will love the appearance of Sweet Chestnut.  Grain can be interlocked, but Chestnut is still relatively easy to work.  It can split relatively easily, so pre-drilling is essential.

This is a new species for us here at Rare Woods and a first for South Africa.  We are delighted with what arrived and can’t wait to get it into some of your projects.

Detail
Common Uses
chestnut-european
Cottonwood

Locally grown version of a species which is originally native to Canada and the USA.  It is not particularly dense but still tough, with low bending strength and stiffness, and medium resistance to shock loads. It works easily with both hand and machine tools. The wood can be nailed, screwed, stained and polished well.  It can be prone to some movement, especially if it gets wet.  In many cases it presents with quite an attractive sheen.  We stock boards, slabs and beams in this well-priced locally sourced timber.

Common Uses:
food containers, furniture, joinery
Detail
Common Uses
cottonwood
Cypress - Local

Locally grown version of a species endemic to the central coast of California that is cultivated throughout the world.  The timber is strong in relation to its weight. The wood works without difficulty with hand and machine tools with only a slight blunting effect on cutting edges.  It can be knotty. It nails, screws and glues well, and gives satisfactory results with finishing treatments.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, furniture, trunks
Detail
Common Uses
cypress-local
Cypress - Swamp

Swamp Cypress is so named for its association with swamp land, with is roots often protruding above the land or submerged into the swamp water where it grows. This light, pale yellow-brown wood known for its durability, toughness and character is also the State Tree of Louisiana. It is an important wood in the indigenous Southeast region of the US, as its versatility and workability lend it to a variety of diverse applications. It is typically straight-grained, although knots are commonly present. Other than the knots, the wood poses no difficult challenges for working, glue and finishing.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, construction, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
cypress-swamp
Ebony - African

This timber has very high bending and crushing strength, with high stiffness and resistance to shock loads. This is a very hard wood to work with hand or machine tools, with severe blunting effect on cutting edges. Gluing is good, and it can be polished to an excellent finish.

Common Uses:
cutlery, knife handles, musical Instruments, tool handles
Detail
Common Uses
ebony-african
Ebony - Amara

According to the only sources we could find willing to step up to the plate on this wood, Amara Ebony and Macassar Ebony are of the exact same species (Diospyros Celebica), with the difference put forth being that Amara is exclusive to Indonesia. Amara is known for its deep chocolate browns with pink striping; the difference in its coloration and that of typical Macassar Ebony being attributed to the soil conditions in Indonesia. Its grains are more likely to be wavy or irregular than straight, with a fine texture and nice natural luster.

Our experience yields a broader perspective, as we have found the wood sometimes with greens and reds, more similar to Malaysian Blackwood, at times with darker and more muted hues¬† and devoid of any pink shades. Pieces which more resemble Macassar have also contained gold – orange hues, in addition to pinks. It’s sap content is tan in color and, despite its density, it has good working properties.

Common Uses:
carving, furniture, inlay, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
ebony-amara
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    Volume Primer

    Our bulk packs are sold in units of volume. (1 pack = 0.1m3).
    Depending on thickness and length you select, you will get a different effective total width. Depending on the widths we select, you will also get a different number of pcs.

    For example, 0.1m3 of 2.45m lengths will get you the following +- TOTAL WIDTH and +- PCS (assuming an average piece width of 140mm) for each thickness:

    M3LENGTHTHICKNESSTOTAL WIDTH+- PCS
    0.12.4526mm1570mm9-12
    0.12.4538mm1075mm6-9
    0.12.4550mm816mm4-7

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